Tag Archives: 5+5×5

5 x 5 + 5 THAT WAS A BUST!


Well, nobody, apparently, is interested.   So much for that.   It was lots of fun for the first round and I thought that after having about 40 people interested last time, that I would have SOME takers this time.   Maybe I’ll try this at another time, but am discouraged now, so I doubt that I will.

Not even sure that there is anyone out there who bothers to read this.

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The Other Next Week: 5 + 5 x 5


Nearly 3 weeks ago, I wrote that I would have something about my next round of 5+5 X 5 interviews.   Turns out that next week didn’t end up happening until this week.   So, if you’re interested in participating, leave a message in the comments below.  Because everybody schedule varies, I decided that I would not use the list from the last round.  I want to be sure that those who volunteer have the time to do so.   So, here is what you need to do:

1.  Leave a comment below no later than Sunday, November 3rd if you want to participate in this round.

2.  I’ll notify those I randomly select from the comments on Monday or Tuesday Nov 4/5.

3.  You answer the questions and email them & 5 images to me by Nov 20.  I’ll prepare a draft copy of the post & send to you prior to publication.

This will be a different set of questions than the ones I posted previously, but will still focus on photography.  I’ll begin posting Round 2 of 5+5 x 5 beginning December 4.

BrancusisCamera

Camera, Tripod, Frame: Atelier Brancusi

5 + 5 x 5 Mike Hardisty


I recently asked 5 photographers to share about their work by sharing 5 images and answering 5 questions.   Today, meet Mike Hardisty who blogs at Say It With A Camera.

All photographs in this post are by Mike Hardisty, Say It With A Camera.

About Mike Hardisty

Based in North Wales I create images of the scenery around me. An unusual word to use with photography, create. But it’s true. It’s very rare that I post an image S.O.O.C. (straight out of camera).

Think about it. Why should I let the software geeks and ultimately the processor inside my camera dictate what the final image will look like? It’s my photograph, my vision.  That’s why I’m a firm believer in using software like Photoshop and PhotoMatix to create HDR images.

Right from the start I learned how to shoot in Manual, TV, AV — you know — all those fun modes. Why let a machine make the decisions?  That’s how SKYNET started and we all know how that ended.

I’m not into the whole Canon versus Nikon versus Sony argument. I leave that to others more suitably qualified. The Pentax K-30 is a great camera; it suits me and my needs and I’ve no intention of changing it in the near future. Oh! And another thing. I use a PC not a MAC.  Sorry if I’m disappointing anyone, but a good fast PC will do the job just as well as a MAC and it’s a lot cheaper too.

Nowadays all of my photographs are licensed Creative Commons which means you are free to use them as long as it’s non commercial. All I ask is that you provide the proper credit by mentioning Mike Hardisty and Say It With A Camera.

1.  How did you become interested in photography?   What has kept you interested in it?

In the early sixties (I’m showing my age now) I was going on a school trip to Spain and Italy from the UK. I bought a small camera, probably Kodak, and some film. Later when I was working abroad I bought a Yashica — now there’s a name from the past — Through-the-Lens film camera. I stuck with that and had an on/off relationship with photography until the nineties when I bought a Praktika SLR. 

The coming of digital was a revelation to me. It meant I could experiment without worrying about the cost of developing film and if something didn’t work I could just delete it off my hard disk.

Ynys Llanddwyn or Llanddwyn Island is a small tidal island off the west coast of Anglesey, North Wales.The island is very rich in legends, and in particular the association with Dwynwen. The name Llanddwyn means "The church of St. Dwynwen". Dwynwen is the Welsh patron saint of lovers, making her the Welsh equivalent of St. Valentine. Her Saint's day is January 25 and is often celebrated by the Welsh with cards and flowers

Ynys Llanddwyn or Llanddwyn Island is a small tidal island off the west coast of Anglesey, North Wales. The island is very rich in legends, and in particular the association with Dwynwen. The name Llanddwyn means “The church of St. Dwynwen”. Dwynwen is the Welsh patron saint of lovers, making her the Welsh equivalent of St. Valentine. Her Saint’s day is January 25 and is often celebrated by the Welsh with cards and flowers

2.  Describe your photography,  e.g., what do you like to shoot the best, how would you describe your style.

Landscapes, especially here in the Snowdonia National Park, Wales. I’m lucky to live very close to the sea but the National Park is a short drive away, Beautiful scenery, but wild, rugged and sometimes dangerous at the same time. 

I use HDR in a lot of my photography; to me it’s just another tool in the digital arsenal that’s available to photographers nowadays. I try to keep the photographs looking natural though.  It’s what you need from a landscape.

Dolbadarn Castle

Dolbadarn Castle is a fortification built by the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great during the early 13th century, at the base of the Llanberis Pass, in North Wales. The castle was important both militarily and as a symbol of Llywelyn’s power and authority. The castle features a large stone keep, which historian Richard Avent considers “the finest surviving example of a Welsh round tower”. In 1284 Dolbadarn was taken by Edward I, who removed some of its timbers to build his new castle at Caernarfon.

3.  Do you assign yourself photography projects?   

Funnily enough, I have just completed a project to photograph outside and inside most of the historical churches that lie in the Conwy Valley and surrounding hills.  North Wales is steeped in historical buildings; we have castles, abbeys, churches, some dating from the 8th Century although many are 11th and 12th century. 

I’ve had to pay more attention to using the available light; some of those churches are really dark inside with no flash allowed. Composition plays a big part as well.  Instead of shooting straight down the central aisle, I’ve been using angles and also bringing in some foreground interest.  For many of the photographs my camera is set to manual, takes me out of my comfort zone, but necessary to cover the available light. Of course HDR has also helped by enabling me to capture some of the detail in the highlight and shadow areas.  

Pentrefoelas Parish Church

Pentrefoelas was originally part of the parish of Llannefydd. It became a separate parish in November 1810. There is evidence of a “chapel” at Pentrefoelas in the sixteenth century. A new building replaced it in 1766, but it was not consecrated until 23 June 1771. T here were additions in 1774. The church was completely rebuilt in 1857/59.

4.  What do you know now about photography that you wish you knew when you started?  How would this be helpful to someone just learning about photography?

Maybe not so much when I started, but don’t put yourself in harm’s way just to get a photograph. I was in the National Park last winter, visiting a well-known and much photographed lake. I wanted photographs of the lake with the snow-covered mountains behind it. Stupidly, I ignored all the warnings:  build up of clouds, light snow falling intermittently, wind getting up. I got caught out on the side of the mountain. The clouds came down, it started really snowing. Fortunately, I was standing on a well established path, knew the trail would lead me to safety, about 500 metres, but it was frightening at the time. The falling snow covered the icy patches on the trail making it dangerous to walk on; I could so easily have slipped.  

Seriously, NO photograph is worth taking a risk for. 

Miners Track

The Miners’ Track was built to serve the Britannia Copper Mine on Snowdon and is ideal if you want to walk on Snowdon without going all the way to the summit. The path starts off wide and even, climbing gradually past Llyn Teyrn to Llyn Llydaw, where the ruins of the old copper mine can be seen.

5.  What was the best piece of advice/information give to you as you were learning photography?

Read the manual for your camera, know what all the functions are and experiment, experiment, experiment.

I still experiment. Talacre Beach with the lighthouse is my favourite outside location and our local cathedral is great for trying all things inside.  

Talacre Sunset

Sunset on Talacre Beach silhouetting the abandoned lighthouse

 

More about Mike:  here.   You can follow Mike’s blog on Facebook and at Say It With A Camera.  

You can find all of the 5 + 5 X 5 series here.

5 + 5 X 5 Lynne Ayres


I recently asked 5 photographers to share about their work by sharing 5 images and answering 5 questions.   Today, meet Lynne Ayres who blogs at Beyond The Brush and Beyond the Brush Photography.

About Lynne

Lynne’s latent interest in photography lay dormant for years until time and temperament finally came together in the digital age.  She found that with little effort on her part her trusty Sony Cybershot 4.1 mega pixel camera produced some excellent images.  Encouraged, Lynne began to approach photography the way she approached her painting – in shapes and contrasts and balance.  Lynne now uses a Nikon Coolpix L610 16 mega pixel – still an uncomplicated point-and-shoot – but considers each shot she takes with an eye to composition.  Her interest lies not only in what the camera and her eye will capture, but also in how it may be transformed in the post production.

All photographs in this post are the work of Lynne Ayres, Beyond The Brush Photography.

1.  How did you become interested in photography?   What has kept you interested in it?

Decades ago I thought about dabbling in photography but,  for various reasons, I didn’t pursue it.  Two years ago I started a blog I thought would be about my art, and a place to display it.  Somewhere I took a turn and it became about photos from some of my travels and then I found I was posting more about photos than my paintings.  That led to using what I learned through my art to produce better photographs.   I have always needed an artistic outlet and photography provides various avenues, from the taking through the processing, and that keeps my interest charged.

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2.  Describe your photography,  e.g., what do you like to shoot the best, how would you describe your style.  

I don’t know that I have a ‘style’ – in my paintings I gravitated to landscapes and this naturally formed the base and starting point for my photography.  Now it’s not so much the subject as the interesting shapes, forms, light and contrast that attract me.  I like to run my photos through various post production programs to see what gems may be hidden in them and often giving them a painterly feel as opposed to a photographic image, and sometimes transforming them into abstracts through digital processing.

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3.  Do you assign yourself photography projects?   

I consider myself an undisciplined amateur with a camera in my hand – I just haven’t approached my photography that way, but I think I will give that some thought.  I don’t know if it classifies as a project per se, but I am interested in capturing photos that tell a story in a single shot – what that story is, will be up to the viewer, but photos that open themselves to interpretation.

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4.  What do you know now about photography that you wish you knew when you started?  How would this be helpful to someone just learning about photography?  

Composition, composition, composition.  Photography, like all art, is about contrast and form, about trying to portray a three-dimensional world on a flat surface. My camera is not fancy, I don’t have various lenses but I have my eye and I look long at my view finder and move about before pressing the button.

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5.  What was the best piece of advice/information given to you as you were learning photography?  

I haven’t received any direct advice regarding how-to – I have been shutter-bugging on my own, without any instruction, but some have said I have a ‘good eye’ and that has encouraged me to go with my own flow – some turn out pretty awful and some turn out pretty fine … I have overheard, “What is she taking pictures of now?!” and I smile.

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More about Lynne:
You can follow Lynne at Beyond The Brush and Beyond the Brush Photography.

You can read all of the 5 + 5 X 5 posts here.

5 x 5 + 5 Sherre Hulbert


I recently asked 5 photographers to share about their work by sharing 5 images and answering 5 questions.   Today, meet photographer and mixed-media artist Sherre Hulbert who blogs at Sherre’s ArtZone.

All photographs in this post are the work of Sherre Hulbert and copyrighted Sherre Hulbert Photography.

About Sherre:

Sherre has always had a love for the creative arts. From sewing to quilting, painting to collage to gardening to photography, she has been actively creating her whole life (ask her about the paper dolls she and her sister spent hours designing clothes for!) She can’t imagine a life where creativity doesn’t play a major role. She loves to shoot flowers and landscapes, and is looking towards taking more portraits in the future. She uses a Nikon D5100 and loves her 50 mm 1.4f lens perhaps the most and also uses her iPhone to capture those unexpected photo opportunities when she doesn’t have her camera.

1.  How did you become interested in photography?   What has kept you interested in it?  

My love of photography began when I had my first child, Ami, 33 years ago. I bought a Minolta and thought it was the best, although it didn’t have lens-changing capabilities or anything that fancy. I would take photos mostly of my kids and my garden. Once the kids were out of the house and hubby and I started travelling a bit more, I began taking more pictures. I just bought my first “lens changing” digital Nikon last year , and have been taking online classes and lots of pictures to attempt to gain some semblance of mastery (which will take the rest of my life, I think).

I Am The Vine

I Am The Vine

2.  Describe your photography,  e.g., what do you like to shoot the best, how would you describe your style.

I have always loved taking floral photos in my garden. Love using my Macro lens out in the yard. I also love landscapes and especially sunsets — don’t ask how many sunset shots I have! Living near the California coast gives lots of opportunity for ocean sunsets. I am enjoying learning how to do dreamy textured photos from Kim Klassen, but tend to “take” shots rather than “make” shots. I also love a harder-edged grunge look and create a lot of digital montages using not only my own photos, but incorporating other images, elements and typography.

Love of Reading

Love of Reading

3.  Do you assign yourself photography projects?

A friend and fellow photographer Sherri Reed invited me to join a small Flickr group called “A click.” She is giving us assignments, I am doing my first this month. It gave me a fun new way to take a really twisty image; I probably would have just done that sort of thing in Photoshop before. And I am always working on digital art, either as montages or digitally painting some of my own photographs. I am fortunate to be at home, so can usually spend a few hours each day either working on my photographs in Lightroom and/or Photoshop, or taking online photography and photo-editing classes. I have co-taught online digital montage classes in the past, which was a lot of creating and designing projects.

Sausalito Harbor

Sausalito Harbor

4.  What do you know now about photography that you wish you knew when you started?  How would this be helpful to someone just learning about photography?

Although money was tighter when my children were young, I wish I had always had a camera body that had interchangeable lenses. I am loving having a camera like this!

St Francis and Wisteria Pod

St Francis and Wisteria Pod

5.  What was the best piece of advice/information give to you as you were learning photography?  

Practice, practice, practice… take online classes where possible; at least look up freebie tutorials. Study art design principles; you can use the principles of composition, perspective, values, line, etc. in your photography. I am also a painter and mixed media artist which I think helps me in composing my shots (at least I hope so!).

Tulip Tree

Tulip Tree

More about Sherre   

You can follow Sherre at SherresArt Zone, SonomaCountySnapshots, on Facebook, or Flickr.

You can read all of the 5 + 5 X 5 posts here.

5 + 5 X 5 Adrian Pym


I recently asked 5 photographers to share about their work by sharing 5 images and answering 5 questions.   Today, meet Adrian Pym.   Adrian blogs at Adrian Pym Photography.

All photographs in this post are the work of Adrian Pym and are copyrighted by Adrian Pym Photography.

About Adrian:

Adrian is a UK-based amateur photographer with a growing following (according to WordPress stats anyway). Favouring landscape photography of all varieties; rural, coastal and urban, and in mono, colour and selective colour formats. I am also a digital imaging novice trying to learn the complexities of Photoshop and NIK software.

“It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera….they are made with the eye, heart and head” – Henri Cartier-Bresson.  In my case Nikon, Photoshop and NIK Software also play a part!

1.  How did you become interested in photography?   What has kept you interested in it?

I remember picking up my father’s camera and wanting to take photographs, but what really got me passionate about photography was a trip to Sicily when I was 14 or 15.  We stayed overnight on the island of Ustica, just off Palermo.  I awoke early and the hotel room had a view across the bay and I saw an image I had to shoot.  The soft sunrise  playing off the calm sea and silhouetting a yacht as it made its way slowly and silently into the bay.  I even remember waiting to get the position of the yacht and the rising sun in just the right place.  As it was a film camera I had no idea of whether the composition worked, or even if it was in focus and exposed correctly (the light was fairly low).  When it was developed the shot was so good we had it enlarged and framed.

I played around with a film SLR for several years but interest waned.  It wasn’t until I bought my first digital camera, when my eldest son was born, that my interest, and passion, for photography returned.

Just wish I still had a copy of that image from Ustica !

2.  Describe your photography,  e.g., what do you like to shoot the best, how would you describe your style.

Landscape, city and urban, coastal and countryside are my favourite subjects but I have also experimented with still life and abstract.  People tend only to appear to add scale and portrait photography is not something that really interests me.  I have dabbled with some street photography with mixed results.  My style doesn’t have a  name but viewers will see my leaning towards monochrome, black and white which I believe adds to rather than subtracts from an image.

3.  Do you assign yourself photography projects?

Yes – I need to, to maintain my enthusiasm for photography.  I often suffer from photographers block or “shutter seizure”, when I just cannot think of anything to shoot.  I have a long-term project (or is it just a recurring theme?) in that I shoot doors.  It started with a photo course project when I put together a portfolio titled “The Doors of Oxford” and it has now “gone global” with the launch of a dedicated blog with contributors from around the world –  Legion of Door Whores.

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4.  What do you know now about photography that you wish you knew when you started?

How would this be helpful to someone just learning about photography?Too many to list really, and I am always learning.  I don’t see myself as a technical photography, I can’t list the correct exposure settings for a given subject, or remember whether f4 or f22 gives more depth of field (I have to stop and think!) but to answer the question with one word, the thing that makes an image is COMPOSITION, get that right and you are nearly there, the other factors will follow.

5.  What was the best piece of advice/information give to you as you were learning photography?

Experiment with different compositions for the same image which helps you understand what works and what doesn’t.

More about Adrian:

Adrian blogs at Adrian Pym Photography and Legion of Door Whores (blog, Facebook).

You can read all of the 5 + 5 X 5 posts here.

5+5 x 5 Emilia Brasier Photography


I recently asked 5 photographers to share about their work by sharing 5 images and answering 5 questions.   Today, meet Emilia Brasier who blogs at Emilia Brasier Photography: The View Through My Lens.  All photographs in this post © Emilia Brasier Photography.  Any permission for use must be granted by Emilia Brasier Photography.

Emilia began learning about photography from her mother as a child. She comes from generations of photographers, going as far back as her great-grandfather. Emilia spent hours working in the dark room developing photographs with her Mom while still in elementary school. She also went to college photography classes with her Father as a pre-teen.

As a psychology major in college, Emilia found herself taking a black and white photography class that left her less than invigorated about photography. After photography was put aside for a long while, a trip to Africa reinvigorated her passion for photography. Only recently getting the courage to share her photography with the world, Emilia started her blog a little over a year ago and has been enjoying sharing her photography with readers since. Emilia hopes to one day be able to travel the world taking photographs.

1. How did you become interested in photography?  What has kept you interested in it?

I became interested in photography as a young child, because my Mom was always taking photographs when I was growing up. I enjoyed watching her take photographs and learning from quick little lessons she gave me when I asked to use her camera. I always loved finding those special spots during a hike and having the opportunity to capture those images with the camera.

Photography has kept my interest because, it provides me with an outlet for anxiety, emotion, creativity, and more. My favorite way to use photography is to explore places, old and new, for things that can help me see them in new ways. There are times when I feel a lull in my motivation to pick up the camera, but I find that if I carry my camera around and just keep exploring, it is not hard to find my way back! 

Carosel

Carosel

2. Describe your photography

I like to consider myself an exploratory photographer. Finding places I’ve never been and capturing still life is my deepest passion. I found being in Africa to be extremely inspiring, because everything was new to me. I enjoyed taking pictures of buildings, people, the ocean, and wildlife. I also enjoy event photography, I am venturing into portraits, and hope to get into birth photography within the next year.

Orange Poppy on Step

Orange Poppy on Step

3. Do you assign yourself photography projects?

I don’t really assign myself photography projects, but there are times when I actively work on a certain part of photography, for example close up or macro photography, depth of field, or portrait poses. Recently I have actively been working on becoming more confident in my work by showing people my photography. I have done this by creating a blog and joining the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.

I would like to eventually choose some specific projects with more direction than I currently employ in my natural exploration of the world.I haven’t really set up projects for myself, in part, because of my full-time involvement with my young family. As my children enter school, I do plan to commit more time to my work at which point I will want some set goals which may involve creating projects.

Peacock 1

Peacock 1

4. What do you know now about photography that you wish you knew when you started?  How would this be helpful to someone just learning about photography?

One of the biggest things I wish I had known is to take photos of same subject from many different angles, distances, and with different exposures. Experimentation has been a huge help in developing my skills. I think this is one of the major benefits to digital photography, because experimentation is affordable and extremely important to improvement. At least that has been my experience. 

I think trying to see your subject in new ways is really key for any person interested in photography. Although it is nice to know exactly what you want and shoot just for that, it is equally important to look to stretch your ability, knowledge, and creativity by trying things that may not have been your first idea. Often I like the photo that I thought I wanted, but there are probably an equal or greater number of times when I like one of the more experimental shots more so.

Peacock 2

Peacock 2

5. What was the best piece of advice/information given to you as you were learning photography?

The best piece of advice given to me about photography was just recently. It was that if I have a strong idea about photography, even if it does not follow current trends, it may be enjoyed by many and help me stand out as a photographer. Staying true to oneself will set you apart from the rest.

Petal In PInk

Petal In PInk

See more of Emilia’s work at her blog.

You can find the entire 5 + 5 x 5 series here.

5 +5 x 5 (update)


A big thank you to all of you who said that you would like to participate in my 5 questions + 5 images for 5 photographers series.   I was overwhelmed that more than 30 of you responded!

I have selected 5 from those who responded and have emailed them.   Unfortunately, if your comment did not include a link to either an email or a website/blog, I could not consider you as I selected.  Be sure that your Gravatar provides links to your site or to contact you.

Because of the response that I had, I anticipate that I will run this again.   But, first, let’s see how the first round goes.    You can look forward to seeing the 5 +5 x 5 series on Wednesdays beginning September 4th.

Shake it like a Polaroid!

Polaroid Means Fun!

Photographers Wanted 5+5 x 5


5 photographers.
Plus 5 images.
Answering 5 questions.

I’m looking for 5 photographers to participate in a new series that I will be featuring here called 5+5 x 5.

It’s simple:  I will feature 5 photographers.  I will share 5 of their images and ask them to respond to 5 photography related questions.  Each photographer will select the images they want to share, and each will respond to the same 5 questions.  Included will be some brief info on each photographer and links to blogs/website/social media where their work can be found.

It doesn’t matter what type of equipment you use.  It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been photographing.   It doesn’t matter whether you prefer street photography, portraits, or landscapes.  It doesn’t matter whether your blog has 5 followers or 500 or 5000.  (5000! That would be something!)  It doesn’t matter if you shoot film or digital, or believe that post-processing software is the best thing in the world — or the worst.  All that matters is that you have a passion for photography and that you’d like to share it with others.

Interested?   Please let me know in the comments below and I will contact you. I’m hoping to get the questions out to my 5 participants by August 15th, and plan to begin the series around the beginning of September.  If I have more than 5 volunteers, I’ll select 5 for this initial round.   I could draw names out of a hat, but I don’t have too many hats…. I’ll think of something;  I plan to run this regularly, so I’ll keep you in mind for future rounds of 5+5 x 5.

Here are 5 of my images, selected using this criteria: “Oh yeah! I like that one!” as I scrolled through my archives.

UPDATE:  I clearly have more than 5 volunteers, so I will randomly select 5 names.  Also, to give anyone who wishes to participate a chance, I will select from all who comment before 1pm (EDT) Saturday, 8/10/13.  Thanks for your interest in this project.