My Shakespeare Bucket List


The Comedies

All’s Well that Ends Well Read Stage FPHP BP PHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHP OperaPHPHPHPHPHPHPH
As You Like It Read Stage (3x) xxx xxx xxx
A Comedy of Errors xxx Stage xxx xxx xxx
Love’s Labors Lost xxx Stage xxx xxx xxx
Measure for Measure Read Stage xxx xxx xxx
The Merchant of Venice Read Stage Film xxx xxx
The Merry Wives of Windsor xxx xxx xxx Broadcast Play xxx
A Midsummer’s Night Dream Read Stage (2x) Film xxx xxx
Much Ado About Nothing Read Stage xxx xxx xxx
Pericles, The Prince of Tyre xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
The Taming of the Shrew Read Stage xxx xxx xxx
The Tempest Read Stage Film Broadcast Play Opera
Twelfth Night Read Stage xxx xxx xxx
The Two Gentleman of Verona xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
The Two Noble Kinsmen xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
The Winter’s Tale xxx Stage xxx xxx xxx

The Histories

King John RDPH StPHP FPHP BP PHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHP OperaPHPHPHPHPHPHPH
Richard II xxx xxx xxx Broadcast Play xxx
Richard III Read Stage (2x) xxx xxx xxx
Henry IV, Part I xxx xxx xxx Broadcast Play (2x) xxx
Henry IV, Part II xxx xxx xxx Broadcast Play (2x) xxx
Henry V xxx xxx xxx Broadcast Play xxx
Henry VI, Part I xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
Henry VI, Part II xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
Henry VI, Part III xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
Henry VIII xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx

The Tragedies

Romeo & Juliet Read (2x) Stage FPHP BP PHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHP Operatic Adaptation
Coriolanus xxx xxx Film Broadcast PlayΒ  xxx
Titus Andronicus xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
Timon of Athens xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
Julius Caesar Read Stage xxx xxx xxx
MacBeth Read (2x) Stage (3x) xxx xxx Operatic Adaptation
Hamlet Read (2x) Stage (3x) Film xxx xxx
Troilus and Cressida xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
King Lear Read Stage (3x) xxx xxx xxx
Othello Read xxx xxx Broadcast Play xxx
Anthony & Cleopatra Read xxx xxx xxx xxx
Cymbeline xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx
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17 responses to “My Shakespeare Bucket List

  1. Just found my way here via your “like” on my blog – thank you for popping by πŸ™‚ I love Shakespeare – my all time favourite is Hamlet. I have fun freaking the French out with the “To be or not to be” speech πŸ™‚

  2. LOVE Shakespeare; I have a Bachelor’s in English Lit and Creative Writing, yet he’s about the only pre-1800 writer I truly love! =) [Voltaire just-barely excepted chronologically, heh]

    • I took a degree in English too. But I read very little Shakespeare in college and working now, many years later, to not only read through his works, but to see as many Shakespearean plays as I can. That is a slow feat, but maybe one day I’ll be able to claim that I have seen all of them in performance.

  3. You haven’t seen the Much Ado {Emma Thompson} or Macbeth {Patrick Stewart} movies?
    Howz this for a bucket list entry: The Huntington Library in Los Angeles has a Shakespeare garden, all the flowers ever mentioned in the plays. ;o)

  4. So, does this mean you haven’t seen Julie Taymore’s film, Titus with Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange? You should pick up the film on Netflix and watch it on a decent TV, but if you can’t: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbpoG092YAQ&feature=relmfu (not my account–I hope the whole thing is there)
    Harry Lennix is brilliant as the evil Aaron!

  5. Shakespeare bucket list! This is such a fun idea. πŸ™‚

  6. I’m interested to see that you’ve put ‘Troilus and Cressida’ in with the Tragedies. The original editors of the 1609 Quarto and the 1623 Folio couldn’t make up their minds whether it was Comedy, Tragedy or History. I’m teaching the play at the moment and the first question I’ve set for my groups is what genre do they think the play is and why do they think there was so much debate about it in Shakespeare’s day.

    • Thanks for your comment Alex. It’s an interesting question for discussion and I do wonder how that frames one’s expectations about the work. If you don’t know the classification, does it alter how you perceive it? Does it matter?

      I copied the list as they are posted in the complete works volume that I have without thought to how they were categorized. I’m not an expert by any means and don’t know enough about the academic arguments regarding the classifications, but there are some of the plays that I am confused by their classifications as “comedies”. The Merchant of Venice is certainly one of those; I could never look at this as a comedy. although there are comedic elements, given the story line about the forced baptism of Shylock. The Winter’s Tale is another one that I wonder about it’s classification. Perhaps part of this is a modern (and non-academic) construct of “comedy” and “tragedy”. But the bottom line is that it doesn’t matter much to me in terms of enjoyment of the play itself. I would say the same thing about the authorship question: in the end it doesn’t matter to me whether it was Shakespeare who wrote the plays or some other guy named Shakespeare, although it is an interesting debate (or parlor game, depending on one’s point of view). The play is still the thing.

  7. I love this idea! What fun!

  8. Your Shakespeare Bucket List is an awesome idea! I love Shakespeare! Mind if I borrow your idea? =)

    • No problem Ms. Scribbles. The Bard of Avon “stole” all sorts of ideas for his plays — and I certainly hold no monopoly on trying to read & see every one of his plays!

    • Artemislexie: I’ve redone my list as a html table. If you’d like the code to put into your blog, please email me. It wasn’t difficult, but it was timeconsuming. All you’ll need to do is change the values of the indiv column entries.

  9. Pingback: My Summer of Shakespeare (Part I) | Four Deer Oak

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