Black & White Osprey


Textured Tuesday’s theme is Black & White & Textured.   Typically, I wouldn’t use a texture on a nature photo, but a slight grungy texture added a bit more drama to the clouds.   More details on processing below.

Osprey3

First I used a LR for a little bit of sharpening and then used a preset to convert the image to B&W.  At first I tried to make it appear like a cyanotype, but I didn’t like how cool the photo was, so I selected a preset that had warmer tones and then adjusted the curves, bumping up the green to give that ghostly feel to the tree limbs and the bird’s head.    Then, in ACR, I “hand-tinted” the background a very pale blue.   Added the textured “Frosted”, which I also handtinted in ACR using the same shade,  and then removed the texture from most of the image except in the upper corners.

Here is the SOOC image, taken just before sunrise last January a few minutes before sunrise on Sanibel Island.

OspreySOOCBe sure to stop by Kim Klassen’s Café and see some amazing Black & White & Textured images.

 

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12 responses to “Black & White Osprey

  1. Great pictures!!
    You have been nominated for Liebster Award, please check it here http://demaodyssey.com/2014/05/23/liebster-award/

  2. Amazing B&W! What a difference!

  3. Beautifully done. Love tne hints of blue.

  4. Wow! Wonderful capture!

  5. Oh how lucky you are to have seem such a beautiful bird and to be able to photograph it is awesome. I love the b/w brings out the detail and really puts the importance on the subject.

  6. What a great capture Anne! The black and white looks so dramatic and beautiful!

  7. Magnificent. Either way.

  8. Love the black and white it gives it such a timeless quality…

  9. So cool!!! Great shots!

  10. Gorgeous B&W processing!

  11. Great image, it’s amazing how much the bird pops out in the B&W image compared to the your coloured image.

  12. Beautiful! More than 20 years ago, the ospreys began nesting in our area; now they are quite common. I love knowing they will come at the end of March each year and the young will be the last to migrate south in September.